“Forget the mistake – remember the lesson”

There are many strategies you can use to create more engaging lessons, some of which include:

Active learning: Encourage students to be actively involved in their own learning by incorporating hands-on activities, group work, and other interactive elements into your lessons.

Real-world connections: Make connections between the material you are teaching and the students’ lives and interests. This will help to make the material more relevant and engaging for the students.

Use technology: Incorporating technology, such as videos, educational software, and interactive whiteboards, can be a great way to engage students and make the material more interactive.

Variety: Mix up your teaching methods by including a variety of activities and instruction methods. This can include lectures, group work, discussions, hands-on projects and more.

Clear Objectives: Communicate clear and measurable learning objectives to the students at the beginning of the lesson or unit. This helps to keep the lesson on track and gives the students a clear understanding of what they are expected to learn.

Encourage critical thinking: Ask open-ended questions, give the students opportunities to problem-solve, and design activities that encourage them to think critically.

Add humor: Use humor in your teaching as long as it is appropriate. It can help to ease tensions and create a more relaxed atmosphere.

Create a comfortable and safe learning environment: Create a space where students feel comfortable and safe enough to speak up, ask questions, and take risks.

Get feedback from students: ask the students for feedback and use it to improve the lesson.

It’s worth noting that not all strategies will work for every student and it is important to always be aware of the specific needs of your students, their backgrounds and their learning styles. Remember that creating a positive and supportive learning environment is important and it’s an ongoing process.

Author
Dr Graeme Salter

Helpring create engaging educators